Знаю! Business Breakfast:
Human-centric Organization
The content of the meeting.
PRINCIPLE #1: ENVIRONMENT

RULE: Only English
PRINCIPLE #2: PEOPLE

RULE: Mutual respect and openness
PRINCIPLE #3: FLOW

RULE: No pushing or strict boundaries, keep the 'flow'
STAGE 1: GTKYEO
Getting to know each other
1. Name
2. Workplace
3. Why are you here?
4. How do you understand: human-centric organizations?
STAGE 2: GOOGLE PROJECT ARISTOTLE
5 key dynamics
Discuss in groups/pairs HOW you see these key dynamics through your experience and perspective and WHY they are important?

Psychological safety: Can we take risks on this team without feeling insecure or embarrassed?

Dependability: Can we count on each other to do high quality work on time?

Structure & clarity: Are goals, roles, and execution plans on our team clear?

Meaning of work: Are we working on something that is personally important for each of us?

Impact of work: Do we fundamentally believe that the work we're doing matters?

Infographics (открыть)
STAGE 3: MATT SAGAKUCHI
Emotional connection --> Psychological Safety
Read the case: (from the article)

After Rozovsky gave one presentation, a trim, athletic man named Matt Sakaguchi approached the Project Aristotle researchers. Sakaguchi had an unusual background for a Google employee. Twenty years earlier, he was a member of a SWAT team in Walnut Creek, Calif., but left to become an electronics salesman and eventually landed at Google as a midlevel manager, where he has overseen teams of engineers who respond when the company's websites or servers go down.

''I might be the luckiest individual on earth,'' Sakaguchi told me. ''I'm not really an engineer. I didn't study computers in college. Everyone who works for me is much smarter than I am.'' But he is talented at managing technical workers, and as a result, Sakaguchi has thrived at Google.

Sakaguchi had recently become the manager of a new team, and he wanted to make sure things went better this time. So he asked researchers at Project Aristotle if they could help. They provided him with a survey to evaluate the group's norms.

When Sakaguchi asked his new team to participate, he was greeted with skepticism. ''It seemed like a total waste of time,'' said Sean Laurent, an engineer. ''But Matt was our new boss, and he was really into this questionnaire, and so we said, Sure, we'll do it, whatever.''

The team completed the survey, and a few weeks later, Sakaguchi received the results. He was surprised by what they revealed. He thought of the team as a strong unit. But the results indicated there were weaknesses: When asked to rate whether the role of the team was clearly understood and whether their work had impact, members of the team gave middling to poor scores.

He decided to gather every off-site to discuss the survey results.

''I think one of the things most people don't know about me,'' he told the group, ''is that I have Stage 4 cancer.'' In 2001, he said, a doctor discovered a tumor in his kidney. By the time the cancer was detected, it had spread to his spine. For nearly half a decade, it had grown slowly as he underwent treatment while working at Google. Recently, however, doctors had found a new, worrisome spot on a scan of his liver. That was far more serious, he explained.

No one knew what to say. The team had been working with Sakaguchi for 10 months. They all liked him, just as they all liked one another. No one suspected that he was dealing with anything like this.

But then everyone shared something of their personal issues and problems. After that they talked about the survey in little detail.

There was nothing in the survey that instructed Sakaguchi to share his illness with the group. There was nothing in Project Aristotle's research that said that getting people to open up about their struggles was critical to discussing a group's norms. But to Sakaguchi, it made sense that psychological safety and emotional conversations were related. The behaviors that create psychological safety — conversational turn-taking and empathy — are part of the same unwritten rules we often turn to, as individuals, when we need to establish a bond. And those human bonds matter as much at work as anywhere else. In fact, they sometimes matter more.
STAGE 4: PERSONAL CASES
Think of your team
Think of your team and what issues you have now and seek for advice, or just share your 'pain' and think together of what you can do to improve its efficiency and state.
STAGE 5: SERGEY SEK
Q&A Session
Special Guest – Sergey Sek
Founder of Lincoln Company
Sergey is an entrepreneur and marketing strategist. He leads a team of 14 extraordinary co-workers in event management, PR and corporate education.
In his talk Sergey will talk about Human-centric organization, 5-hour work day, consciousness and yellow power.
Special Guest – Sergey Sek
Founder of Lincoln Company
Sergey is an entrepreneur and marketing strategist. He leads a team of 14 extraordinary co-workers in event management, PR and corporate education.
In his talk Sergey will talk about Human-centric organization, 5-hour work day, consciousness and yellow power.
STAGE 6: REFLECTION
Take a note
STAGE 7: REFERRAL SYSYEM
building the community
How it works
1
Come to the breakfast at least once with a fee
2
Third time is a charm – come the third time for free
3
Invite people and come both = 2000tg/person
4
Buy a yearly membership
Interested in the membership?
Insights
TO THINK

Google research In 2015,

Google published the results of a team productivity survey. The option "hire the best people" does not give the best results. Here is what gives: 1. Psychological safety - team members are free to take risks and be vulnerable / imperfect (real) in the team 2. Interdependence - everyone in the team can rely on others, perform work on time and at the proper level 3. Structure and clarity - team members clearly know their roles and goals 4. Meanings - work is important personally for each employee 5. Effect - the work of team members is of great importance and changes the world
APPS TO TRY


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